Eka Pada Bhudanasana

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Eka Pada Bhudanasana translates as “one legged mountain pose” and it is the ninth position in the Prana Vashya sun salutation.

How to get into the position

Starting, then, in Bhudanasana (having held mountain pose for 5 full breaths) you inhale and raise the leg.  The right leg is raised in the first vinyasa.  You then alternate between the left and right legs in subsequent vinyasa; the left leg is raised in the second vinyasa, the right leg in the third vinyasa, etc, etc.

Your shoulders and pelvis must remain square despite being on two hands and just one leg. This is the key to finding stability in the position.   Do not try to raise the upper leg as high as you can at the expense of your hips; do not twist your hips to raise the leg or else you will be uneven and collapse through your torso.  It is the diagonal limbs that give you stability (for example, the left shoulder corresponds to the right leg); do not put weight on one side of the body.    Your vision point remains between your heals on the floor (as in the previous posture).

Benefits

Eka Pada Bhudanasana has all the same benefits as mountain pose with added emphasis on stretching the hamstrings and hip flexors.

Contraindications

Do not attempt this position if you have any recent or chronic injury to the wrists (like carpal tunnel syndrome) or if you have high blood pressure or if you are pregnant.

Damian is an authorised teacher of Prana Vashya Yoga.  To book a class with Damian you can contact him by:

Email: damiancadmanjones@gmail.com

Tel: 0777 900 1896

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/queensroadyoga/

 

 

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Bhudanasana

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Bhudanasana translates as “mountain pose”.  It is different, but similar, to Adho Mukha Svanasana or “downward facing dog” (as discussed below).  Bhudanasana follows Bhujangasana or “cobra pose”; it is the eighth position in the Prana Vashya sun salutation.

How to get into the position

Starting, then, in Bhujangasana by lifting your waist / hips above the shoulder line and coming up on your toes, then exhale and come onto your heals to make a “V” shape with your body.  To deepen the posture, lengthen your tailbone away from the back of your pelvis to tilt the pelvis and lift the sitting bones toward the ceiling.

Bhudanasana should be held for five full breaths.  From a breathing perspective, this posture is an inversion and works the diaphragm cranial, improving lung mobility.  With each inhalation, press your palms and straighten your arms in line with your torso (vision point between your heals on the floor).  On each exhalation, press your heals to the floor ensuring your knees are straight.

When holding the position do not collapse your shoulders and do not allow your chest to come towards your thighs to work your arms (like when in downward facing dog).  In Bhudanasana the emphasis is stability, so the weight distribution between the palms and feet is more even as the torso is kept in line with the arms.  This allows you to observe the effects of the arms and legs on the spine as you hold the position.

Benefits

Bhudanasana stretches the shoulders, hamstrings, calves and glutes, and strengthens the arms and legs.  It has also been credited with improving digestion, relieving headaches, insomnia, back pain, and fatigue. Bhudanasana is also good for helping treat high blood pressure, sciatica, depression and asthma.  It also neutralises the spine between backbends and forward bends.

Contraindications

Do not attempt this position if you have any recent or chronic injury to the wrists (like carpal tunnel syndrome) or if you have high blood pressure or if you are pregnant.

Damian is an authorised teacher of Prana Vashya Yoga.  To book a class with Damian you can contact him by:

Email: damiancadmanjones@gmail.com

Tel: 0777 900 1896

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/queensroadyoga/

 

Bhujangasana

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Bhujangasana translates as “cobra pose” (so-called as snakes can easily lift their head). This posture follows Sashtangasana or “position held by 8 limbs of the body”; it is the seventh position in the Prana Vashya sun salutation.

How to get into the position

Starting, then, in Sashtangasana with empty lungs, you inhale and come up on your palms keeping your weight on your thighs and open your chest by rolling back your shoulders, fixing your vision at the tip of your nose.

Benefits

Bhujangasana is a back bending pose which strengthens the spine and stretches the torso, chest, shoulders, and abdomen. Bhujangasana is also noted in the Gheranda Samhitha as a posture which increases body heat and destroys all diseases.

Contraindications

Do not attempt this position if you have any recent or chronic injury to the wrists (like carpal tunnel syndrome) or back or if you are pregnant.

Damian is an authorised teacher of Prana Vashya Yoga.  To book a class with Damian you can contact him by:

Email: damiancadmanjones@gmail.com

Tel: 0777 900 1896

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/queensroadyoga/